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May 17, 2008

Comments

Michael Lee

Oh yeah - that's good comics! I still have trouble getting past Barry's crew cut for some reason though.

I wonder how many variations have been done on that cover over the years? Seems to me I've seen quite a few.

Mark Engblom

"I still have trouble getting past Barry's crew cut for some reason though."

Whaaat? I love the crew cut. I actually recoil at the early 70's Flash stories that show Barry with the full head of 70's hair and the mutton-chop sideburns. Definitely not a good look for Barry.

As for the cover, there certainly have been a number of homage covers over the years. I started gathering some of them to make a gallery, but never finished. Maybe I should resume my search, huh?

Gustavo

Yes please!

I love homage cover galleries, and F2W seems like a great idea to cover ( no pun intended).

BTW, "F2W" would have been the all armored up, over violent, foil enbossed 90s retelling of Flash of two words.

meng

this has always been the Holy Grail of comics for me. i loved the entire Earth 2 concept and the JSA. the DC Universe's greatest concept.

does anyone know if this comic followed other Julie Schwartz edited comics where the cover was created first and the interior was crafted around it? it'd be wild to think that such a wide ranging concept was based on a single cover.

Carmine Infantino's work has always had a surrealt/abstract quality to it... the infinitely distant city skyline (what was the deal with Central City anyways, i always thought it was in the midwest but it has Manhattan-like skyscrapers) and the massive 20 ft wide sidewalks. Joe Giella's never been a favorite but he really helps to ground Infantino's pencils a bit, same as he does with Gil Kane pencils...

btw, in case you havent seen this site, here's a link to some of the homages that appeared in just the Flash line of comics itself:
http://www.hyperborea.org/flash/cover-homages.html

kylistener

Ahhhhh...

I agree. "Subtle and understated"... both in story AND in the drawing...

Wonderful angst-less stuff... many thanks for the trip back!

kylistener

Mark Engblom

"BTW, "F2W" would have been the all armored up, over violent, foil enbossed 90s retelling of Flash of two words."

LOL! Yeah, you've nailed the 90's thing. Now that I know a few people are interested, I'll take another pass at the Flash #123 homage gallery. Stay tuned!

"i loved the entire Earth 2 concept and the JSA. the DC Universe's greatest concept."

Me too! I've written about it from time to time on the blog. You might want to check out my "JLA-JSA team-ups" category on the sidebar to the right for more extensive Earth-1 and Earth-2 coverage.

"does anyone know if this comic followed other Julie Schwartz edited comics where the cover was created first and the interior was crafted around it?"

I'm not positive, but my guess would be that "Flash of Two Worlds" wasn't crafted around the cover design. The step of bringing back the Golden Age Flash likely entailed some discussion between Julie Schwartz and his pen of creators, considering it was a pretty big step (perhaps even requiring a phone call to DC's legal department to cover all their bases). Of course, the vast majority of Flash stories WERE constructed around a gimmicky "stunt" cover, so I don't blame you for wondering.

"Wonderful angst-less stuff... many thanks for the trip back!"

My pleasure. I'm glad others appreciate the tone of those older stories. Yeah, sometimes they could get a little too understated (i.e. "dull"), but on the whole, I'm fond of their more straightforward, cool-headed style of storytelling.

Like an early 60's Sinatra tune.

PAUL SAETHER

Are you aware, Mark, that in 1957 a guy called Hugh Everett III published a thesis known as "The many worlds interpretation".
This used the concept of infinite realities to explain the PROVEN fact that objects (electrons) can be in MORE THAN ONE PLACE AT THE SAME TIME!

The author insists that the same applies to any thing - tables can be in more than one place at the same time...so can you or I.

All to do with that mind-boggling QUANTUM THEORY apparently.

I've just been reading all about the subject of infinite worlds in a book called 'The Universe Next Door' by Marcus Chown.

Apparently this Infinite realities theory is widely accepted as being likely by most of the great minds in the field of Quantum physics.

Everett's (at the time) recently published thesis is the most likely reason for that 1961 Flash story I would guess.

Maybe not in every universe though!

What do you think of that!

Mark Engblom

Since editor Julius Schwartz and several of his writers had connections to the sci-fi publishing world, it makes sense that some of them would be familiar with contemporary science theories. My only exposure to the theory is Michael Chrichton's "Timeline" book, which spells out a theory similar to the one you described.

Is it true? Who knows...though the possibility of "Mark Engblom of Two Worlds" is certainly intriguing.

Ralph C.

So, in the set of panels where Barry has his costume come out of his ring (which I always thought was cool), he basically stripped down to his underwear and changed in front of Mr. and Mrs. Garrick, or did he put the costume over his clothes like he did here.

(From the "Silver Age Comics" site, 12/11/07 "I've Got Something To Tell You, Honey..." post.)

Gotta luv that Silver Age!

Mark Engblom

Yeah, I wondered about that sequence at first, too, Ralph...but then remembered that Barry's costume went on OVER his clothes, as improbable as that sounds. But, I guess if we can buy a uniform shrinking and expanding from a tiny ring, we should also be able to accept a costume looking skin-tight while covering a suit, pants, and a bow tie.

Right?

Ralph C.

Yeah, okay fine, Mark.... I guess so. I'll give in on this one, I suppose.... this time, for the good of comicdom!

:-)

Mark Engblom

The things we do for the good of comicdom!!!

Kyle

Of course, that doesn't explain why Jay Garrick, who had retired twelve years previously (in 1949), happened to be wearing his Flash costume under his clothes that very day. Did they double as long underwear or something? (I remember wondering about that the first time I saw this golden oldie.)

Mark. Engblom

Well, "between panels" Jay had mentioned a crime wave hitting Keystone City, so I suppose it's possible he'd been contemplating coming out of retirement to get it under control. Although, when you think about it, of all the retired JSA members, Jay's super speed would have allowed him to operate under the radar the entire 12 years.

Or, maybe he grabbed his costume at super-speed back in his bedroom, put it on, then opened the shirt in front of Joan for dramatic effect.

Okay, I got nothin'. Yeah, it's a pretty odd panel now that I think of it. Are you happy now, Kyle? (just kidding)

Pat Curley

Actually Fox had made clear Barry's fascination with the Jay Garrick Flash very early; in Barry's first appearance in Showcase #4, he's shown reading an old copy of Flash Comics. It appears to be Flash #13, but the cover is just something Infantino made up, because the actual cover feature of Flash #13 was Hawkman. (Despite its name, Flash Comics was an anthology title and Flash and Hawkman alternated on the cover).

Flash #123 is one of the highlights of my personal collection, one of the two books I was most thrilled about when I got a copy (the other is Secret Origins #1).

digital dissertation

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digital dissertation

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